Christopher Teschmacher

Fund Manager

Chris is something of a perfectionist which may explain the raft of automated spreadsheets ensuring charts are properly formatted to Teschmacher® standards. Having become the resident quiz master, he keeps his colleagues on their toes with a steady stream of investment trivia. This worldly Dutchman has wanderlust in his blood – he was born in Australia and has lived in London, New York and Paris. He has since settled in London with his young family, although regular trips to the South of France suggest that ambitions to become a vineyard owner are still strong.

Posts by Christopher Teschmacher

Macrobites

Financial football: The Multi-Asset World Cup

While the 2018 football World Cup is still in the early stages, we have already been holding our own multi-asset tournament, in which the 32 competing nations battle for goals on several economic and financial criteria. Which teams will go far, scoring goals on economic excellence, and which ones will flunk at the final financial whistle?

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Portfolio Thinking

Yield us not into temptation

In my previous post I outlined the possible benefits of using multiple asset classes to achieve a more stable and attractive level of yield from an income-focused portfolio. In this post I take aim at targeting a fixed level of yield, showing that this objective could mean you miss the big picture.

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Portfolio Thinking

The Big Squeeze

Much like the choice between TV channels, income investing was easier in the old days. Investors seeking stable and attractive income from their investments needed to look no further than bonds. These days, with yields near historic lows, many investors are looking elsewhere.

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Macrobites

Le moment est venu

With the final round of the French elections just days away, the political moment that people have been talking about since President Trump’s election has arrived. While the polls point to an overwhelming win for Macron, I take a quick look at the ways in which this election could still turn, and also the reasons why this time could be different to Brexit and Trump.

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